O ' K E E F F E abode

 

Georgia's distinct-yet-understated personal style, as well as her minimalist, mid-century studio and homes in the southwest, will always fascinate and inspire me. While searching for a higher resolution image of the photo below (courtesy of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe) I came across a great blog post on her Abiquiu home, which was in complete disrepair (had gone to rack and ruin!  when she purchased it in 1945. The subsequent photos and words are from the July, 1981 issue of Architectural Digest and the blog Lunch & Latte.                                                                                                                  

 “When I bought the house, it was totally uninhabitable.” −O’Keeffe

“When I bought the house, it was totally uninhabitable.” −O’Keeffe

  Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) in 1981.

Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) in 1981.

"When O'Keeffe bought the Abiquiu house in 1945 it was in ruins and not a single room was inhabitable (she first saw it in 1930 and made many attempts to buy it). O’Keeffe supervised the restoration of the house, which took four years, and it was her friend Maria Chabot who carried it out. To preserve the original house, existing structures were used to build new adobe walls (mud dried in the sun, mixed with straw) and stucco was used over the adobe, as rain will eventually wash it away. The only alteration she made was opening up some of the walls to have a view of the valley and mountains, the inspiration for her landscape paintings." Lunch & Latte

  O'Keeffe's cast-epoxy sculpture,  Abstraction , 1945, in the Roofless Room.

O'Keeffe's cast-epoxy sculpture, Abstraction, 1945, in the Roofless Room.

  Her painting  White Patio with Red Door , 1960, in the sitting room, one of her many door paintings.

Her painting White Patio with Red Door, 1960, in the sitting room, one of her many door paintings.

  The minimalist bedroom. "I haven’t anything you can get along without," said the artist.

The minimalist bedroom. "I haven’t anything you can get along without," said the artist.

 Dedicated to making every space aesthetically satisfying, the artist adorned an adobe bench in the sitting room with natural forms, including a rattlesnake skeleton recessed under glass.

Dedicated to making every space aesthetically satisfying, the artist adorned an adobe bench in the sitting room with natural forms, including a rattlesnake skeleton recessed under glass.

  The Indian Room derives its name from the narrow adobe ledges, which the early Indian inhabitants used as beds.  Having faithfully restored the wooden ceiling and adobe walls, O’Keeffe recognized that “building in adobe is like a disease. Once you start using it, you can’t really ever stop.” A Pueblo Indian pot glows in this context.

The Indian Room derives its name from the narrow adobe ledges,
which the early Indian inhabitants used as beds.
Having faithfully restored the wooden ceiling and adobe walls, O’Keeffe recognized that “building in adobe is like a disease. Once you start using it, you can’t really ever stop.” A Pueblo Indian pot glows in this context.

  An old doorway, the former main entrance. Beams were used to strengthen the adobe construction.

An old doorway, the former main entrance. Beams were used to strengthen the adobe construction.

  This photo shows a pathway in O’Keeffe’s patio. The curvy, sculptural-like architecture is also visible.

This photo shows a pathway in O’Keeffe’s patio. The curvy, sculptural-like
architecture is also visible.

 Chimneys crown the 1930s residence and studio.

Chimneys crown the 1930s residence and studio.

artist-georgia-okeeffe-abiquiu-nm-home-studio-adobe-walls.jpg
 The artist has often painted the rugged hills beyond the corral.

The artist has often painted the rugged hills beyond the corral.